Jossan’s further recovery

Jossan has recovered after the first surgery without an infection or complications. We just had to keep an extra eye on her not to get out of her protective body. She was a little Houdini, she, as soon as she was off her painkiller that was also a bit sedating, she would somehow take off her body-sock!
This collar did not help a bit:

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The soft collar that Jossan could take off in 3 seconds; rotate, hold with one paw, pull out the head, using her other paw. :/

I had to put on a plastic collar on her, and then one day when I came back from job this is what waited for me:

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“Yes Mom, I took the body off, and the collar is still on!” HOW?! My Houdini!

So, I had to work some from home and take care of Jossan. She was very calm and not trying anything as long as we watched her. Clever lady.

The stitches were removed 2 weeks after the surgery and all was fine, but she still had to be watched for some time. Now she has healed completely. She did go down i weight though, in spite of all the nutritious food. Body takes a lot when healing.

Last Thursday we had an appointment with an animal oncologist in a big animal hospital. We got referred there because Jossan’s veterinary who operated her went on a longer sick leave and we had to get another surgeon and someone to talk to.

It was good to meed an oncologist. She told me that cats can have at the same time different types of cancer. We will see what she has on her other side when it is removed, the next operation is scheduled for 15th of December. Usually the oncologist we met does not recommend to remove all of the mammary glands (different veterinaries think differently), just the one and one more maybe where the tumors were found. Jossan is in a good condition and took the surgery well, which is not always the case, and that is one of the reasons why she does not recommend it – it is a tough surgery with a very long cut.

I will post some pictures of Jossan’s cut. They are taken with my mobile and not very sharp, but you can see the extension of the cut. It is a very long cut. DO NOT LOOK at the pictures if you are sensitive. There is no blood, but bruises and stitches. The pictures are linked here:

Pictures after the surgery

Also, the kind of tumour that they found so far, on the side that is removed is as I knew, not that aggressive, and actually can be kept down with a medication that is anti-inflammatory (Metacam), not a citostatic, if needed, or a new one appears! That is very good news. But we have to see what kind she has on her other side. And we hope that they remove all of it.

I was away from Friday afternoon to Monday afternoon, went to Norway with Leroy and Albert, to a cat exhibition that we booked a long time before we found Jossan’s tumours. That was supposed to be our first exhibition abroad and I thought to try to get one more certificate each and see if the boys can become International Premiers within FIFe. The hotel and trains were booked, and I went there with a friend that had also some rough time with one of her cats and kitten recently. It was our mini-vacation. Joakim took care of our cats at home, and Jossan.

The exhibition went great, above my expectations, many happy moments,and very happy Leroy (he loves cat shows). Yesterday I came back home and to my beloved cat, with her dad and son and all the medals and bows and we cuddled so much, I was happy. In two weeks, we have a new operation before us, and after that some more recovery to do. And then I hope Jossan will be healthy for many more years to come.

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Jossan is at home, after the operation

We’ve just came home with Jossan and put her in her bed, in front of the warm radiator. She is in half dark, in a calm and safe environment. She is still tired and painkillers make her calm and a bit sedated. She got a lot of IV fluids today, after the operation, and a medicine against sickness, they said she was a bit sick and threw up after the operation.

The operation went well, I talked to the veterinary after Jossan woke up from anaesthesia. Jossan is a fit and slender cat, small to medium in size (she weighs 3,4 kg), but very long; the veterinary said that she had a lot of mammary glands mass in one row they removed (t was a unilateral operation, they removed the whole chain of mammary glands on one side). The veterinary found one more small lump besides the ones I found, high up towards her armpit, she removed all she could from the surrounding tissue. It is sent for analysis, the results will be in two weeks.

Jossan has gotten body-sock, like a baby, in order to protect the cut that is very long. She has a lot of stitches. The veterinary thought the body might work better for Jossan than a cone (Elizabethan collar). We will try and see.

Jossan ion her body-sock

She will get painkillers in her mouth with every 7 or more hours between the doses. We got them with us from the clinic.

painkillers

painkillers

She can eat little, when she is ready for that, soon, we hope, small portions at time, not to irritate her tummy.

Recovery food

Recovery food

I bought a/d, it is good for her and it is tasty; it is food for recovering patients, and it is high in nutrients. I will be at home with Jossan, and check on the wound regularly for a few days, and then remove compress that she has on, after two-three days.

Jossan is resting in low light, covered with blankets and in front of the radiator, to keep her warm.

Jossan is resting in low light, covered with blankets and in front of the radiator, to keep her warm.

I know it will be malignant tumors she’s got, but the question is which kind and what more can be done. The surgery as it is done, plus removal of the glands on the other side in a second surgery gives the best prognosis. But we take one step at a time.

Jossan does not have any family history of mammary gland cancer, but she was not neutered young, and she was on contraceptive pills at times. She was not often on them, but even little increases the risks. And she is a Siamese; Orientals and Siamese are for some reason more prone to mammary gland tumors than other cat races. You go around and hit your head against the wall and ask yourself – why, why, why? But then, it is bad luck and accident; that is why.

I read that the tumor size is the single most important prognostic factor, and hers were very small, about a size of pepper corn, but a few of them:

“Cats with tumors larger than 3 cm in diameter have a median survival time of 4 to 6 months; cats with tumors 2 to 3 cm in diameter have a median survival time of about 2 years, and cats with tumors less than a 2 cm in diameter tumor have a median survival time of over 3 years.” I read more here.

But then, there is statistics, and there is life.
I love Jossan.

Albert, after operation

Albert fell in April and hurt a part of his chest bone, sternum. It was a dramatic jump (that turned to a fall) from a cupboard to the edge of a chair. The first veterinary we went to basically ignored a bone poking out of Albert’s chest and us saying that he is in pain, so we went to another veterinary where he was x-rayed, got pain medication and diagnosed with a dislocated part of sternum. Several days later I called our vet Buba (the first two were in the emergency animal hospitals, since, of course, Albert chose to try to be extra acrobatic on Easter!) and he said that we should wait and see if the bone will go back after some time or not.

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