Albert is a big kitten! (no milk teeth)

A few days ago Albert’s little jaw looked like this:

Now it looks like this (notice, the milk teeth are gone and the new permanent ones are coming out nicely!)

 

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Jaws

Albert is a bit over 5 months old  and right now he has both milk teeth that did not fall out yet and the bright big permanent ones coming out. Look at our little shark!

His sister Ada started losing her milk teeth recently, but our little boy is in a bit of discomfort, nothing is coming out yet, everything just doubles. He started chewing on and biting his toys a bit harder and more often.

Just like us, cats develop both milk teeth, and adult teeth. A kitten’s baby teeth start to appear when it’s about three-four weeks old, and ready to chew soft foods. When the process is complete, the kitten has twenty-six tiny, sharp teeth.

Between 4-9 months of age, a kitten’s baby teeth begin to fall out, as new stronger permanent teeth push them out and replace them. Teething can be painful, and the kitten’s gums may be red and sore for a while.

A close up:

By the time it’s eight or nine months old, that young cat will be a proud owner of thirty bright, sharp adult teeth. Sometimes if the old milk teeth did not fall out yet and the kitten has sore gums it is a good idea to have the veterinary pull the milk teeth out and make the whole teething process easier.

Teeth brushing

Leroy’s gums are a bit inflamed. He had a mild form of gingivitis before, and is prone to it, but a regular care prevents it. In order to calm the inflammation and help killing the bad bacteria, we put propolis drops in his mouth after we cleaned the teeth cleaning.

Leroy does not like the taste of propolis that much. Now, that was a serious understatement; he does not like it at all. After some drooling and foaming (he looked like he got rabies), Leroy went into the sulking mode and showed us clearly how insulted he was. All the Siamese spent the night out of our bed, in another room! Jossan also got some propolis. Maven and Miii did not; they have never showed any signs of gingivitis so far.

It is hard to brush their teeth with any brush; the smallest we could find in pet stores were too big for their small jaws. We tried brushing with the “finger brush” that is made of micro fiber, but that was too big for Jossan, even for Leroy. Now we use cotton swabs (Q-tips) for massaging their gums and cleaning their teeth and that works fine.